9 minutes | Nov 11, 2020

Get Deep Sleep: A Simple Technique to Wind Down

A Technique to Help Get Deep Sleep In these challenging times, many of us are constantly engaged in difficult or stressful tasks. In order to get deep sleep, it’s important to be able to shift out of your active, goal-directed state into a relaxed, winding-down state. Psychologists Colleen Carney and Rachel Mamber, authors of the audiobook Goodnight Mind, share a powerful technique they call “the Buffer Zone.” Today we’re sharing an excerpt from the audiobook Goodnight Mind: Turn Off Your Noisy Thoughts and Get a Good Night’s Sleep. This audiobook addresses the effects of rumination―or having an overactive brain―on your ability to sleep well. Written by two psychologists who specialize in sleep disorders, the book contains helpful exercises and insights into how you can better manage your thoughts at bedtime, and finally get some sleep.   What’s in this episode? In this episode Drs. Carney and Mamber offer helpful advice for how to get deep sleep by creating a “buffer zone” — deliberately shifting gears from a busy day to relaxing and winding down for sleep. Colleen E. Carney, PhD, co-author of the audiobook Goodnight Mind, is associate professor and director of the Sleep and Depression Laboratory at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada. She is conducting research, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, on treating insomnia in people with depression. Rachel Manber, PhD, co-author of the audiobook Goodnight Mind, is professor at Stanford University and director of the Insomnia and Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program at the Stanford Center for Sleep Sciences and Medicine. She has treated hundreds of patients with insomnia, many of whom also have other medical or psychiatric disorders, and has trained physicians, psychologists, and nurses to treat insomnia without medication. Buy or download free audiobook from Audible.com (US) Audible.co.uk (UK) Audible.fr (FRANCE) Audible.de (GERMANY) Have you ever thought about how your body produces deep sleep? If you seem to not get deep sleep, or enough deep sleep, perhaps you are worried that your body’s system for producing deep sleep is broken or has malfunctioned. Luckily, this is rarely the case. In fact, you will be relieved to learn that there are things that you can do to help your sleep system work better for you. Colleen E. Carney PhD & Rachel Manber PhD Authors, Goodnight Mind: Turn Off Your Noisy Thoughts and Get a Good Night's Sleep
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