22 minutes | Dec 23, 2016

Episode 3: Fishies, Legos and Play-Doh

Description: On this episode of the podcast Script discusses where he has been for the last few months, a personal project he is undertaking to help learn new technologies, and answers a question posed to him by listener Brandon Kuenzi in the comments on Episode 2 about the changes he has seen in the last 20 years.   Transcript: Welcome to Episode Three of the Script Van Winkle podcast! My name is Script Van Winkle, but my friends call me (singing) “maybe”. Now on the last episode of the podcast I was telling you all about everything I learned at a great conference in North Carolina and what an awesome and growing tech community there is there. In the first episode I was telling you how I was trying to get a job with a company in a nearby city but how in the end I decided not to apply at that company. That, it turned out was a good thing. Just a few weeks later, me and the Mrs. pulled up our roots in the Mid-Atlantic region, and set them in the soft, fertile, though sometimes sandy, soil of North Carolina. Nice how I tied those two things together. Now, all of this is just really a lame excuse as to why I haven’t put out a podcast in over two months. But hey, it takes a long time to unpack a microphone. I’m just saying. On the plus side, you can consider this episode my holiday gift to you. So Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, or whatever other meaningful holiday you celebrate this time year. So in this “present” tation (see what I did there) I am hoping to accomplish two things. Which would be two more than I’ve accomplished so far this week. First, I’ll tell you about a personal project that I’m going to be using as a vehicle for learning new technologies. Second, I’m going to try to fulfill the request of one of our listeners. After all, I’m rarely asked for my opinion on things. When you are learning new technologies, especially when going through tutorials, you inevitably encounter a variety of sample programs you’re supposed to try out. These range from the ubiquitous “Hello World” programs to more complex ones showing you what the technology can do. Now I HATE sample programs! Ok, I’m not talking about the examples that you find when you’re reading through a tutorial. I love those examples! Especially, because when you’re looking up how to do someth
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