44 minutes | Jun 6th 2014

Episode 011: A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words!

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Click here to listen to The Minimal Pair: Episode 011Show Notes: The Minimal Pair Title: A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words!Episode no: 011Date: Recorded on 5/29/14Topics in Language LearningClassroom ManagementSource: The English Skills Learning Center blog: “Tips on Classroom Management for Adult ELL classes” http://www.eslcenter.org/about-us/blog/103-tips-on-classroom-management-for-adult-ell-classes Classroom management—what and why?Challenges of teaching different age groups and cultural backgrounds in the same classroomChallenges of “mixed classrooms”—English and ESLDifferent college settings (Community college, 4 year college, grad school)The 7 tips the English Skills Center blog shares in their article, and how we implement them in the classroom:Make class expectations clear and realistic and stick to themBe consistent: set class routines that students can become familiar withFind a balance between being your students’ teacher and being their friend (respected vs. approachable)Work to engage all the students while teaching. Don’t base the pace of an entire class on one or two studentsUse interactive activities and open-ended questions as a chance to check student comprehensionAsk for student feedback and incorporate it as appropriate for everyoneRecognize that some discipline concerns need to be addressed immediately, while others are better done individually after class Plus, 3 more tips (from us) for an even 10!Follow the “golden rule”—treat students with the same respect you expect from themDon’t shame students into submission, participation, etc. (Brene Brown)Address different learning styles (in addition to pace) in order to reach everyone[18:04]MethodologyVisual learners FYI: listen to future episodes for similar segments about audio learners and kinesthetic learners!Source: Adam Simpson’s blog, “Teach them English,” http://www.teachthemenglish.com/2014/05/using-infographics-to-teach-language-the-why-how-and-where/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter Beginning EnglishPicto-wikisInfographicTimeline of events in a storyIllustrating student workDiagrams: Venn diagrams, columns, thought-websBuilding blocks of English writing (bottom of pyramid)Intermediate EnglishBuilding blocks of English writing (top of pyramid)Outlining essays (outline as a “blueprint”) Videos (i.e. “School House Rock” for Grammar)Powerpoints (a picture is worth a thousand words—being succinct; animations—giving students a chance to answer first)Presentations (posters, Powerpoints, passed objects, etc.)GraffitiAdvanced EnglishResearch presentations (Powerpoint and beyond)Videos (for the student and by the student)Including pictures in wikis (literal and abstract)Picture outline (a picture for each point)[32:40]Culturally speaking…English-only debateImmigration issuePreserving L1/living in predominantly L1 communitiesLearning the spoken language of new country and letting go of L1Actively integrating both in daily lifeLanguage and identityFirst-generation AmericansKids caught between cultures 3rd culture kidsRole reversal in immigrant families Multilingual countries The linguistic divide can cause political/cultural tension (i.e. Quebec)Language status (English vs. anything in the U.S.)Countries that were formally colonized and the linguistic implicationEnglish as the official language of the U.S.The U.S. does not have an official languageEnglish’s status in the U.S. as the “unofficial official language” Should the U.S. have an official language? What should it be?Should/could there be more than one?Is this an issue to be decided at a state or federal level?Check us out on twitter, FB, gmailKeep it minimal!
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