20 minutes | Aug 19th 2020

90: Nematode Management for Washington Grapes

Some 25 to 30 percent of vineyards in Washington state have nematode population densities that are considered damaging. Nematodes have a slow, chronic negative impact on vine health. Plants have less foliage and visible weak spots in the field. Inga Zasada, Research Plant Pathologist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service is particularly interested in nematode management because Washington is mostly own rooted vines. These vines are highly susceptible to nematodes and farmers need to consider soil health with the imminent replanting of vines in the next 10 to 15 years. Most research on nematodes comes out of California where the nematode populations are different. Current management options are limited to rootstocks or preplant fumigation. Inga and her team are working on practical research for growers including identifying where different types of  nematodes are in relation to the vine and a degree day model for nematode life stages so if chemical becomes available it can be used property. References: Electrifying nematodes and pathogens! | Riga, Crisp, McComb, Weiland, Zasad How Low Can They Go? Plant-Parasitic Nematode Distribution in a Washington Vineyard | East, Moyer, Madden, Zasada Inga Zasada SIP Certified USDA ARS Horticulture Happenings Viticulture Research from Washington State University with Dr. Moyer (Podcast) Zasada Lab Get More Subscribe on Google Play, iHeartRADIO, iTunes, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn, or wherever you listen so you never miss an episode on the latest science and research with the Sustainable Winegrowing Podcast. Since 1994, Vineyard Team has been your resource for workshops and field demonstrations, research, and events dedicated to the stewardship of our natural resources. Learn more at www.vineyardteam.org.
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