30 minutes | Apr 9th 2019

e009- "Don't Outsell your competitors, Out Question them!"| Ed Bilat with Gregg Jorritsma, Senior Director of Sales and Marketing, OnRamp Solutions

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Gregg has been in leadership roles with some of the most well-known companies in the industry including Citrix, BlackBerry, Bell Mobility, Siebel and Delrina. A passionate advocate for “informed selling” and sales professionalism, Gregg credits his success to having been mentored and coached by some great people that took the time to help him on his journey.  Gregg, his wife of 29 years and two sons live in Burlington, Ontario, Canada  WHAT YOU WILL LEARN IN THIS EPISODE: Inspiration stories of Jim Estill  (EMJ Data Systems) and  William Tatham (Janna Systems) Gregg's most memorable sales failure The role of the coach and mentor in his sales career Why there’s no such thing as ‘natural’ salesperson SHOW NOTES [00:20] Intro [00:51] Welcome Greg [01:10] Business success stories that inspire Gregg [02:52] Bringing Syrian refugees to Canada [03:15] Officer, Order of Canada  [06:30] Commitment and passion [07:30] How he got into sales [08:15] Moving to Waterloo [09:05] Getting the first sales job [10:55] No such thing as “natural” sales reps [11:15] Confidence [11:32] Asking customers questions and listening [11:48] Don’t out-sell competitors; out-question them [12:35] A favorite failed deal [13:28] Comforting remarks from his former sales manager [14:24] Keeping in perspective winning and losing [15:41] How storytelling helps sales [17:25] The type of story prospects want to hear [19:05] Using storytelling to overcome objections [21:06] Providing a solution [23:00] Challenges facing today’s sales leaders [23:30] Technology and mobility [28:35] Contact info [29:40] Outro   SHOW TRANSCRIPT Greg Jorritsma:             00:00                When you start a story, typically you can see a physical change in how people in the room are seated and how they're looking at your changes. I always explain that as when you start telling a story, people are preconditioned and hard-wired to listen and they drop their critical thinking barrier. Automated Voice:         00:23                This is the storytelling for sales podcast, a show about leveraging the power of storytelling to ignite your sales performance and grow your business. Ed Bilat :                       00:33                Hello, this is Ed Bilat, and today we'll have a deep and introspective show for you with a great sales leader and my distinguished guest, Gregg Jorritsma, senior director of sales and marketing at On-Ramp solutions is joining us from Toronto, Canada. Gregg Jorritsma. Welcome to the show. Greg Jorritsma:             00:52                Well, thank you very much for having me. I'm thrilled to be here, and I  appreciate the invitation to be part of this. It's a great opportunity. I'm happy to take part. Ed Bilat :                       01:01                I'm really excited that you could join us today and would love to jump right to the interview but before we do this, I will ask you our traditional question, what business success story inspires you and why? Greg Jorritsma:             01:13                That's a great place to start actually. Because I think a lot of this is about identifying someone and seeing something in somebody that you want to emulate and make part of your life. Greg Jorritsma:             01:24                I've always been of the mind that there are no Roy Hobbs out there. There are no natural salespeople, none that I've ever met anyway. I think everyone that is achieving success in sales at some point in their career, mostly early in their careers, had somebody see something in them and really take the effort to sort of mentor them and coach them. I have had the great benefit of having some wonderful people coach me and mentor me over the years, and there are a couple that really stand out above more so than some of the others. A couple I would refer to are both William Tatham and Bill Tatham from Janice systems and now NexJ Health but also Jim Estill. Jim Estill founded EMJ distribution in Guelph when he was just out of university. He started the business by selling printer supplies out of the trunk of his car. Greg Jorritsma:             02:17                He built that business up to probably just shy of $1 billion before one of the big boys Cynics acquired the company. Ed Bilat :                       02:27                Okay. That's not a bad position. Greg Jorritsma:             02:30 Yes. That's not bad stuff. But I think what really resonates with me about Jim Estill is he's always had this sort of a philosophy of being more than just a business guy, but being involved in his community and giving back. A  few years ago, anD I think it was 2015, he actually reached into his own pocket. Now it's reported he spent about a $1.5 million and brought 50 Syrian refugee families to Canada and set them up in Guelph. Ed Bilat :                       02:58                Oh, this is very recent. Greg Jorritsma:             03:02                When I first read about that, I mean it didn't surprise me at all since he was always that type of person that really was not interested in doing good business, but also setting an example. and when he did this, it was just amazing to read about. Greg Jorritsma:             03:15                Recently he's been inducted into the... As an officer of the order of Canada and he's just such a humble man. I've known him for about 20 years. First obviously as a customer selling product Tmj, and then later he has become a friend and a mentor and a real business hero for me. In my mind, I think he is the type of person that you look at and go, Jeez! I hope my kids all grow up to be like him. Ed Bilat :                       03:42 Wow! Well, I know you have two boys, so that's a really good example. Greg Jorritsma:             03:46                Yeah, exactly. I think one of the things that really says it all about Jim is after Cynics and Siebel thing, he recently became the owner of Danby appliances in Guelph. One of the first things he did was change the company motto to " Do the right thing". I think that just exemplifies Jim in every way that is possible. He is the type of person that always does the right thing, I think, in my opinion, and he said, you know, in conversations with him,  he's told me,  it's caused me make some mistakes, and it costs me money, but overall it has served me well and it makes sleeping at night and doing the right thing is, it just makes sense for him. So I've always admired that and kind of look for him for inspiration and guidance from time to time. Ed Bilat :                       04:30                That's a wonderful story. Wonderful story and a wonderful source of inspiration for you and the kids. So what you're saying that you can be successful and then you can do the right thing at the same time? Greg Jorritsma:             04:42 Yeah, I think especially in today's environment, there is so much emphasis on profit, profit, profit, stock market reports, stock tickers and everything else that it's easy to get distracted from doing what's right. I really admire him for that. The other business hero that really comes to mind is a gentleman I worked for a couple of times in the late nineties was Bill Tatham. He founded Janice systems, which was a CRM company and he believed in it and was passionate about it to the point where, he confided in me one time that the sheriffs were at the door to take the house at one point, but he believed in what he was doing and was going to make it right. Greg Jorritsma:             05:25                He did. He turned it around and grew that company substantially in the late nineties when companies like Siebel and Clarify and where the dominant players, this little company out of Toronto came out and grew its business by focusing exclusively on the vertical segment of financial services. One of our strategies was focused on the teaching within the book about crossing the puzzles,so we focus exclusively on financial services and despite the fact we were a fraction of the revenue play that companies like Siebel and stuff were, we were winning on Wall Street with Goldman Sachs and Wells Fargo and All state and eventually the big stock players, a Siebel and stuff came knocking and had to buy the company because they needed the roster, they needed the customer roster. I think it's still $1.4 billion. I think it's still one of the top five or six acquisitions of the Canadian company to date. Greg Jorritsma:             06:23                What I've learned from him more than anything and working in that environment is, if you're committed to something and passionate about it and have the discipline more than anything to stick with it. In those early days as we were chasing around trying to find revenue and customers. It would've been easy to avert our focus away from financial services and just take some opportunistic count. But his vision was to focus on financial services. There were opportunities that we bypassed that we probably could have won, but it was really important that we dominated with financial services and as it turned out, that was absolutely the right move to make so that more than anything is, if you believe in it and you're willing to be disciplined about it, you can achieve something is what I really learned from that. Ed Bilat :                       07:13 I really love it. Those are great two stories you men
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