14 minutes | Apr 28th 2020

Wendy Kiess with 3B Yoga

Play
Like
Play Next
Mark Played
Sara Y.: All right. So welcome, Wendy, to our podcast. How are you doing today?Wendy K.: I'm good, thank you. I'm excited to talk with you, Sara.Sara Y.: Yay, so how's it been going over there 3B? I mean, with everything going on around coronavirus, how have you guys had to adapt?Wendy K.: Well, really quickly, I had to learn how to use Zoom and how to get everyone taught like I was taught how to get on there and to participate in classes, which it took me a few days to get everything kind of going and smooth everything out. But I think we're in a good groove right now. We have a couple of classes streamed every day. I have a few of my instructors streaming classes from their homes as well. So I'm very grateful. But we've had a lot of members jumping on, and we've been keeping class sizes pretty regular. And so that's a great thing.Sara Y.: Yeah, that's pretty amazing to keep that going despite this crazy time that we're in right now. My mom is a member there and taking your classes and loving it.Wendy K.: She is. I love it when I read Shelby Yingling. Come on the screen.Sara Y.: Does Sombra ever join the yoga sessions?Wendy K.: Yes. Yes, she does. She was on last night.Sara Y.: Little bit of poppy yoga. Yes. Well, for people who may not know what 3B is, tell us about your yoga studio. Maybe what separates you from other yoga studios here?Wendy K.: Sure. So in June, I will now have been open for ten years.Sara Y.: Wow.Wendy K.: I know. I can't believe it.Sara Y.: It is amazing.Wendy K.: And I've just really grown it very organically. Ten years ago, the yoga scene was quite different. There wasn't much of one. It was very small and kind of concentrated around the university area. And I live out in Rio Rancho. So I needed something a bit closer. And there just wasn't a lot. Ten years ago. So I took it upon myself, got certified, opened a studio a few years later. And we're still a boutique studio. We're still smaller. I focus on my students that come in, helping them grow, really making it a personalized yoga session as much as I can. I get to know my students, their goals, what they want to get from their practice because everyone has a different reason as to why they come to yoga, and we offer a variety of classes. So we have like restorative yoga, we have yin yoga, we have gentle yoga, we have Vinyasa yoga and some meditation classes. But we also what really set us apart is that we have an Ashtanga program also where we were the only one in New Mexico that has this. We have the Mysore program, which is a self-paced kind of self-led practice every morning, Monday through Friday, and then we take Saturdays off to rest. And then on Sunday, we do what's called LED primary series. So, you know, my roots are Ashtanga. I'm a practitioner. That was important for me to have that connected to 3B as well as the other styles because Ashtanga isn't for everybody. I luckily have good, well-rounded instructors and students so we can kind of support both programs.Sara Y.: For people who may not know what Ashtanga is, can you tell us about that, please?Wendy K.: Yeah. So Ashtanga is a practice that's it's been around for many years. It kind of came into the United States more, I believe, in the 70s, 80s, and it's increasingly become more popular. It was originally taught by Pattabhi Jois, and he taught in Mysore, India, which is why we call it Mysore style. But it is a practice that has a lineage, which is why I kind of like it has set sequences to it. And you learn that sequence. If you're doing Mysore style, you kind of learn as you go. It's not just given to you all at once. You get it; you learn it piece by piece, you start small, and then you just grow your practice naturally so that it's healthy so that it's benefiting you. And it's just it takes different training. It's not like you can just do a teacher training to teach Ashtanga yoga, you have to be a practitioner of it yourself. You have to have teachers that were either taught by the Pattabhi Jois or his grandson or his daughter. You know, there's still a couple of teachers in India. But for the most part, it's a practice in itself. And gosh, there's just so much to say. I could Go on and on. But it's a self sequence that you follow. Yeah.Sara Y.: Is it like a harder version of yoga?Wendy K.: Some people are turned off by it because they say it's so hard. And that's probably because of the way they learned that they tried to like jump into a led primary series for their first time and oh, my gosh, yeah, that's hard. But if you do it  Mysore style, you learn a little bit at a time, and you can build strength and flexibility and kind of get used to these postures, modify them as you need to for your body. So really, it's accessible to everybody if they have, you know, the right teacher, the right experience, the right space to practice. When you look at it, it seems hard for sure if you'll watch someone doing it for the first time, you're just like, oh, my gosh, you know.Sara Y.: Yeah, that can be said about really, any practice if you take the time to really learn it, not just dive right in.Wendy K.: Exactly.Sara Y.: You know, it'll be easier in quotation marks or like right. Or you adapt to the situation like you would with any kind of fitness domain.Wendy K.: Exactly. Like you don't just go and start lifting weights way beyond your capacity. Yes, you don't. You learn. You know, you have to learn how to do it. And that's exactly it.Sara Y.: That's great. So I guess if you're someone living in Albuquerque, you're looking for maybe a challenging or you're looking for  Ashtanga give 3B a try.Wendy K.: Absolutely. Yeah. Like I said, we're the only ones. Some teachers teach Ashtanga classes, primary series, and that. But we have like a regular program of great teachers and people who practice it.Sara Y.: Yeah. So you said I feel like just driving around, you see a lot of yoga studios in Albuquerque. It's kind of saturated. Did you have any growing pains getting through that and separating yourself?Wendy K.: Yeah. I mean the first five years I was open, I kind of had the area sort of to myself in a way. And now and the last five years it's just been like you said, the market is saturated, and people are still opening yoga studios, and we're still set apart because of the kind of practices that we offer and that we are more of a boutique. So and I stick to my roots. Other styles are more popular right now, and that's fine. But that's not my style, and that's not what I've been taught. I stick with what I know and what I specialize in. And our practitioners are the same way. You know, they come for that experience, and they believe in what we do. They believe in our instructors. We just have a good little community, but a very open community. And I think that is what sets us apart. I've had people that have been coming to me since I got certified in 2007. I think that's what makes it special, as have been around for a little while. And we've established a good little community. Sara Y.: That's good. It's definitely easy to get caught up in trying to change you or to adapt and be like the next best thing. But it's good that you stuck to your roots and you don't have that constant maybe change and then your members are then confused as to what's going on. Wendy K.: Right. Because the big yoga trends change, too, and then what if you just stick with the roots back stick with the true foundation. And it's important to me to stick with what yoga really is. There are different ways to achieve the benefits of yoga, but you gotta remember what it’s all about. And I think that that's why people will come back to us. Sometimes we believe they'll try other styles or whatever, but then they come back because we're just rooted down or grounded, and we know who we are and what we're doing.Sara Y.: Yeah, that's that's great. Do you have a favorite class that you guys offer at 3B, aside from Ashtanga?Wendy K.: Yeah, I think it's so funny because when I started the studio and just started practicing yoga in general, I was into the difficulty of it. I love to be challenged. I love it. The harder it was, the better. And because I come from a gymnastics background. And so I just like the challenge of it and the strength that it gave me. It was like a workout for me. And then I quickly learned that that is not what most people like. They like the gentle yoga. They like the more, you know, they come into yoga to kind of quiet and chill out and, you know, just get some movement in their body. So I had to adjust and do some more training to learn how to teach that gentle yoga. And honestly, that's my most popular class are the B Gentle classes where it's just a focus on breath and movement.Sara Y.: Yeah, those are great for someone who lifts like myself. I'm getting into yoga more and more because I'm feeling my body and use it more or more to recover. And it's like you come out feeling like a totally different person. And it's amazing, like not just physically but mentally. I feel like the weight is lifted off your shoulders. You just restored and rejuvenated, and you can go to bed light later; you feel lighter, I guess. Wendy K.: Right. That means that you're getting what you should out of that practice is because the goal of yoga is to quiet your mind. It has other great benefits, but that is the goal is to quiet your mind. And if you can do that, then you do feel lighter, you do feel better, you do feel more restored. All these things come into play. And that's why yoga, that's why you keep going back to it.Sara Y.: Absolutely. For someone who maybe has been wanting to try yoga, but they're nervous because they see people doing crazy positions or headstands and stuff. What would you say to them?Wendy K.: I would say that there's a type of yoga practice for everybody. My teacher, one of the biggest things I remember from my teacher and she was taught this from her teacher, was that if
Play
Like
Play Next
Mark Played