15 minutes | Jun 4th 2020

Marisol Enriquez with Hot or Not Yoga

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TranscriptKevin M.: Mixing It Up With The Fitness Community is a podcast created by Fit Mix that introduces you to local health and fitness individuals along with their stories.Kevin M.: Episode 10. Marisol Enriquez with Hot or Not Yoga. Marisol talks about what makes Hot or Not Yoga different from other studios in town, the changes she has seen in her students, and more.Sara Y.: Hello, how are you today?Marisol E.: Hey, Sara, I'm great. How are you?Sara Y.: Good, thank you. OK. So Hot or Not Yoga. Obviously, you're offering hot or not yoga. But tell us a little bit more about your yoga studio.Marisol E.: Yes. So Hot or Not Yoga. We do offer heated and unheated yoga. People ask about that all the time. We offer heated yoga that's more of a static practice. It's traditionally known as the Bikram method. But we have taken a little bit of a different spin and created some modifications and a different attitude than the traditional Bikram method. We call ours Hot26. It's the same sequence of poses, but we approach it in a little bit kinder way for the human body. And then our non heated classes are a mixture of mobility yoga. So, you know, just creating some movement and strength and increased range of motion for people. And then we also have a traditional Vinyasa flow. We offer some slow flow classes. We offer Yin yoga and Restorative as well. So that is essentially, in a nutshell, what Hot or Not Yoga means.Sara Y.: Cool. So the difference between the two obviously is hot or not. But what's the temperature difference?Marisol E.: Yes. So the hot classes are held at 105 degrees Fahrenheit and approximately 38% to 40% humidity. And then the unheated classes are regular room temperature. We have a really beautiful fan that kind of pulls some of the heat and humidity out of the room, even when the room has been heated prior. So we can let that temperature hover around 75 or 78 degrees.Sara Y.: What would you say is the most beneficial kind of yoga for someone who maybe has like aches and pains in their body and they're turning to yoga to try to get rid of those?Marisol E.: I would ask a few questions first. I would ask about their activity level currently. I would ask about their age and whether or not they've been active in the past, as well as if they've got any known injuries or limitations. Before I would direct them to a specific type of yoga. So we we have a lot of people who have aches and pains, who are athletic people and, for example, runners who would have aches and pains in their lower back, tightness in their legs, hamstrings, glutes, because the running just requires that musculature to activate so frequently. Additionally, they've got pain in their ankles, their feet, their lower legs. And I would recommend something a little bit different for them than I would have for someone who say is mostly sedentary in an office job and hasn't really exercised for a few years or more and is experiencing aches and pains because of the seated aspect of their day. So it really does depend on what's going on with them. Before I could make a recommendation for where they started. If it's someone who reached out to me on email, I would ask those questions. And if they didn't really have a lot of forthcoming information from there, then I would say, you know, you could try any of our Yin classes or Restorative classes. Those would be really nice for addressing aches and pains. And I really like to get people into the mobility classes as well, because that's a really great start. A sort of gentle easing in and exploring range of motion for the body. Before we kind of dive into deep strengthening and more difficult poses.Sara Y.: Very good. And aside from the obvious physical benefits that people can reap from yoga, maybe, what are some of the mental benefits people can get from coming to yoga classes like yours?Marisol E.: Yes. So one of the greatest things I think that people experience and I get to see in their faces when they've completed a class or completed a succession of classes, is that they feel empowered. Empowerment is a very important thing to feel in one's self and in one's body. It improves competence. Additionally, we focus a lot; Yoga practice in general focuses a lot on the breath. The breath work that we utilize can really help to create a sense of calm and peace. So people feeling empowered and energized from their activity, but also a mental and emotional calm and peace just gives them a better way to confront things like conflict that they might be dealing with or sort of manage their responses in response to things like conflict. And also just the mundane day to day things that could create boredom. In fact, instead, they might feel grateful for the pause instead of feeling like they have nothing to do. So it kind of gives a little bit of a shift of perspective, appreciation for the body, an empowerment, feeling, confidence, as well as peace and calm. There's just a whole array of really amazing benefits that a yoga practice can provide.Sara Y.: Yes, definitely. Going back to your yoga studio. How long have you guys been around here in Albuquerque?Marisol E.: We opened in October of 2015. So in October of 2020, we will be five years old.Sara Y.: And how have you grown or changed over those last five years.Marisol E.: Well, I think one of the biggest things is when you first sort of start a business, I think you have this idea of what the business is going to be. What the community is going to look like. What your schedule is going to look like. What all of it's going to look like. You sort of have this idea and thought. And one of the most interesting things that I've learned over the years is that what really happens is when people start coming to the business, we start attracting certain communities of people and they are who actually form and create and build the heart of the studio itself. So we have in response to that, shifted a little bit in the way of what kind of classes we offer. What times we're offering. Our approach to the business itself. For example, we've switched our business model a little bit from just being like a random, anybody can come any time to shifting into a sort of let me work with you as far as on a wellness consultation before we direct you to create success and achieve your specific goals. So it's a little bit more personal now. I would say we follow a little bit more of the boutique model. Boutique business model than we do the large studio model. But we're kind of a mix between. So that evolution for our business has been really cool to experience and really eye opening. So it's essentially our customers and the people who are coming in are helping us shift into a place where we think that we should be.Sara Y.: Very cool. Would you say that kind of personalized touch, that path that you put people on is what makes you unique?Marisol E.: Yes, I would definitely say that. For sure. I don't know of many other studios who actually do that in depth, sort of one on one, consultation before creating a specific plan first for students to follow, to achieve and then checking in, direct, throughout the process after like a two week period, the 30 day period, the 60 day period, the 90 day and continually after that.Sara Y.: And since making that transition into that kind of model, how have you seen your clients grow in yoga?Marisol E.: I've seen tremendous growth in their physical body, but also their physical bodies I should say, but also with their... What I see when they're coming in, and even now that we're hosting virtual classes, there's a whole different level of dedication and tying it back to that empowerment aspect. People who come to the classes regularly, at the same times. They have formed their own little communities of cross communication and support, and they just help nurture each other. So what I've seen is that our nurturing has assisted their level of nurturing for themselves and for the other students within their classes and their communities as well. So, I mean, aside from the fact that they're getting stronger, they're getting more flexible, more capable, they're adding on extra activities outside of the yoga room. They're starting to join our strength classes, if that's what they're going to. Our older students are feeling way more empowered to go out and work in the yard, you know, things like that, where just that level of nurturing I think really helps, too. But it creates a connection as well, so that so that people feel open to tell us that they are growing in those ways outside of the studio. So aside from their physical growth, we also experience their external growth.Sara Y.: That's wonderful, I love that. Where do you see yourself going. Um, Hot or Not Yoga going in the future? What does the future look like for you guys?Marisol E.: It's such an interesting thing to consider right now because we are dealing with all of the closures due to the COVID-19. We are now implementing something that we wouldn't necessarily have thought to implement before. Which is the virtual aspect of classes. So while our wellness consultations have created, or have been held, over the phone and via text and e-mail, sometimes they're not usually held virtually. But we're now offering that. And we can see as Zoom we can still have a face to face conversation. So before someone even steps foot in the studio, they've already got a face to look for that's familiar that they can come in, which kind of breaks down some of the intimidation aspect of it. I think that perhaps as we grow further into this year, we might begin implementing more of the virtual aspect in conjunction with the in studio aspect and maybe even creating an offering, a regular virtual membership or adding some virtual options to the existing memberships that we have.Sara Y.: Very cool. So this situation that we're dealing with right now is kind of a blessing in disguise.Marisol E.: Yeah. You know, I'
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