18 minutes | Jun 25th 2020

Amy Patton with Bear Canyon CrossFit

Play
Like
Play Next
Mark Played
TranscriptKevin: Mixing It Up With The Fitness Community is a podcast created by Fit Mix that introduces you to local health and fitness individuals along with their stories.Kevin: Episode 13. Amy Payton with Bear Canyon CrossFit. In this episode, Sara talks with Amy about her passion for helping people, the tight-knit community Bear Canyon has, how they're keeping members and staff safe from the Coronavirus after reopening, and more.Sara: Hey, Amy, how are you doing today?Amy: Hi, Sara. I'm great. How are you?Sara: Good, thank you. So you are one of the owners of Bear Canyon CrossFit. Is that correct?Amy: That is correct.Sara: All right. In a nutshell, talk to me about Bear Canyon CrossFit and what all you guys offer.Amy: Well, Bear Canyon CrossFit is obviously a CrossFit gym. But in the last five years we've owned it we have expanded into, not only the CrossFit classes that we offer starting at 5:30 in the morning going throughout the day. We also offer a full-body body workout class, which is called My Sweat Class. I teach that three days a week at 9:30. And then we also offer a functional body-building class, which is the class that focuses on the upper body. It's only upper body. And then on Thursdays, Beth coaches the lower body. So it's glutes and the lower body workout on Thursdays. And then also we've incorporated Olympic lifting in the evenings. We also do Strongmans on Sundays, although currently, that's kind of on hold right now. So we try to hit all different areas for people that don't or they're scared of CrossFit. Then we try to offer more than just a CrossFit gym.Sara: I feel like something that sets you apart as all of the different classes that you guys do offer. So it's like more, maybe like you said, more friendly. The classes that aren't so CrossFity that maybe people are scared to take. You have a a lighter version of.Amy: Yeah, I would agree with that. I think one of the hardest parts of owning a CrossFit gym is there's this perception that you have to be a certain kind of person to be able to walk into our gym and be able to workout. Like we're gonna ask you to clean 135 lbs. And so one of the things that we did is we offered this Sweat Class; really with a focus of not just CrossFit. Not just barbell stuff. And just to kind of reiterate, very few people are walking through the door and doing 135 lb cleans. So we try to make it a safe environment, no matter if you're coming from walking as your source of exercise or you've been doing CrossFit for 10 years. And so, yeah, we try to make sure that the doors are open for an 18-year-old kid and also for a 60-year-old person that just wants to feel healthier. So, yes, we try to do that.Sara: I agree. There's definitely this misconception. I get it all the time. Every time I try to talk one of my friends into trying CrossFit. Well, I'm not in shape yet for it. And I'm like, when I started CrossFit 5 years ago I was not in shape for it and I could barely deadlift, you know, at 95 lb bar. I could barely snatch a 55 lb bar. It's like, were you in shape when you started playing CrossFit, I mean playing soccer when you were 5-years-old. No. It doesn't go like that. Walking through the doors the first step.Amy: One of the things that I love about what I do is that sense of accomplishment, when people are sitting in the parking lot and they want to come in and they're nervous. I mean, how many times have I had people say, well, I came here for two weeks straight and I, you know, every other day and I sat in your parking lot and then I just drove away. Then that one time when they did walk in and then that feeling that they have when they finished the class and they're like, oh, my gosh, I can do this. Yeah, I was on an empty bar or yeah, I was on a train. A bar. Yeah. I had the wooden blocks on my bar to help me with the deadlifts, you know, but I was able to do it. So I think there's a sense of accomplishment when people get the courage to come in here and then they have the courage to finish the class. That's what I love about what we do. You know, it's these little teeny changes that we do in people's lives or put into people's lives.Sara: Absolutely. So do you find your members doing the functional class or do you find people doing the CrossFit class also doing the functional class as well?Amy: Well, so the functional bodybuilding classes is a pretty popular class. We have child care, so we have a lot of the same people that come into my Sweat Classes. If they want to train five days a week. They'll come 9:30 Monday, Wednesday, Friday in my Sweat Class. And then Tuesday, Thursday to Mark and Becs, functional bodybuilding classes. So, yes, but we also have our CrossFit athletes that want to work on their upper body and they want to take an hour once a week and just focus on upper body. So we have a full range of our CrossFiters doing it. And then we have, people that are what we call the Sweat Functional Bodybuilding people. To be honest with you, it's amazing. In the last what I've done Sweat for maybe two years now, almost 95% of them have a full CrossFit membership because they started out with a Sweat and Functional Bodybuilding. And then they're like, well, I can do CrossFit now. I mean, because Sweat is incorporating CrossFit and Functional Bodybuilding. It's incorporating both of those movements. We find that people are switching their memberships on that. So, yes, we get full range of people that are doing both.Sara: So with the Strong Man class, I know you said it isn't happening right now. Talk about that one.Amy: Well, we've had this epidemic that's been going on. I don't know if you're aware of it. Sara: What?! I've been living under a rock. Amy: It has taken the world a little bit. So we've been open now for three days when we were closed for three months. And so trying to figure out how to open a gym and make sure our members feel safe has been an unbelievably difficult puzzle. And I will give major kudos to Mark, who has been thinking of almost everything. So obviously, Strongman is flipping tires and keg lifts and heavy movements. Trying to do that in their block where they're working out is nearly impossible. So just like CrossFit Kids, the Strongman classes, we've had to put those on the shelves right now until everything kind of settles a little bit.Sara: Definitely. What is one thing that you think separates yourself or makes you unique from the other CrossFit gyms in Albuquerque or New Mexico.Amy: We're very, very lucky. We have a really strong community of CrossFit gyms here. From [CrossFit] Abq to Big Barn. I mean, there's a lot of really good, Duke City. And we have really good relationships with all of those, all of the CrossFit gyms. And I don't know if I would ever say that we are better than anybody. I think that we kind of keep our nose to the ground. We try really, really, really hard to not get caught in any of the gossip or get upset when somebody takes one of our ideas. We kind of are in this thinking as if somebody takes one of our ideas that we started with. It must have been a really good idea. And so I think one of the things that's made our gym successful, we have with Fit Mix included dropping in over, I think we had about 250 members. And I would say that we try to make this a really, really great community of people, but we leave the, excuse the expression, the bullshit out the door. So if there's drama or bullshit that's going on, we tried really hard to not get involved in that. We also want to be seen as more than just a CrossFit gym. We want to be seen as a gym that will get back to the community. We want to be seen as when a member walks through the door and they've lost their job or their kid is sick or they're going through a divorce and they can't pay for their membership. We know deep down that they need to be here will waive memberships. And so that gives me chills because really, truly, that is why I'm doing it, There's a sense of community and caring. I do a lot of the nutrition consulting here and the joy that I get from somebody that walks through the door that, you know, has an eating disorder or hates their body or feels yucky about themselves and they can express that and clean up their food and get off sugar. And, you know, whatever they do, whether they're like just watching what they eat and then the transformation mentally, maybe not even physically, but mentally is so gratifying that it's worth the time and effort that we put into the gym. So I would say that we care. And I think that all the other CrossFit gyms care too. So I wouldn't say that we are any different. We're just trying to continue to do what we're doing because what we've been doing has been successful.Sara: Yeah, and community is a huge part. I think that's why almost everyone gets into CrossFit. They just recognized that there is more of a community aspect than you could at other gyms.Amy: I think there's a sense of support. Like right now we're having showers put in, which is a really big deal for our gym. We are putting hours in, which is something we've been wanting to do for a long time. But we used our member, who is a construction guy. When our AC goes down, we send a message out and one of our AC guys, that's our member, does it. If we need a reupholster. We just redid our couches and we had one of our members reupholster the whole entire couch. So we really try to stay within it to help run this gym so we can support our members financially as well because they've supported us. We've had very, very little turnover during this time. Most of our members have stayed with us and a couple of them had to freeze their accounts for a month or so just to kind of get ahead and make sure their family was taken care of. And we completely understood all of it. We've continued to do Zoom classes and all that. Supporting people that aren't comfortable about coming back into the gym.Sara: Yeah. And one thing maybe people m
Play
Like
Play Next
Mark Played