18 minutes | Jul 29th 2020

Stanley Black & Decker: Lillie Beiting, on What Is PPC?

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When Lillie Beiting of Stanley Black & Decker joined us early on in the show, she laid down a great outline of what pay-per-click is!Danny:Lead generation is a typical challenge for most, if not all manufacturing marketers. You have to constantly feed the beast. Now, one of the most often used digital tactics to help generate leads is utilizing a pay-per-click or “PPC” campaign. And when it first rolled out, it seemed almost magical. You just set up a list of keywords, and voila. Clicks to your website. Well, things have changed a little bit over the last few years, and it’s not as easy as it was. It’s way more competitive. You can spend a ton of money on it and get nominal results. And it’s not a “Set It and Forget It” type of thing. Things can change every single day among many other variables. So for today’s episode, we’ve got a very special guest. We have Lillie Beiting from Stanley who’s going to share with us her process on PPC and some tips and tricks on how to get the results that you’re after. Now there’s a lot going on in this, so we are going to break this into two different episodes. And today we’ll be focusing on, “What is PPC?” I’m Danny Gonzales.Judson:And I’m Judson Voss.Danny:And this is IndustrialSage. All right, so let’s jump into this two-part series of PPC. On this first episode we’re going to talk about “What is PPC?” What’s going on there? So before we jump into all that, Lillie, I was hoping you can tell us a little about yourself, your history, your background.Lillie:All right, so I am Lillie Beiting. I am currently working for Stanley Black & Decker, but I worked for one of their products called CribMaster. We are industrial vending solutions. And previous to that, actually I was in automotive. So I was in a whole bunch of different tiers of automotive, but I gave it up. I’m now on the industrial side. So a lot of background in digital marketing with that.Danny:Cool. Excellent. Very cool. All right, so I kind of want to lay a little bit of a foundation for our viewers who may not be as familiar with PPC. There’s a little bit of misinformation out there.Lillie:There’s a ton of misinformation.Danny:So just kind of let’s go basic. What is it?Lillie:So pay-per-click is just that. It’s a click you pay for. Now I know people think that it’s just AdWords or just what you see on a search engine. It’s a lot broader than that. And when I discuss it, I kind of use it as a generalized term because so much of pay-per-click is on so many different platforms and mediums now. So just think of it as that, but something like Facebook could be pay-per-click. Display can be pay-per-click. LinkedIn can be pay-per-click. Arguably even boosted content could be that too. So again, just think of it kind of as the medium in which you purchase internet advertising now. Video can be pay-per-click. It all varies.Danny:Gotcha. Okay, so it’s removing– Because I know a big thing is with that– You mentioned that you think, at least I know I did for a while, it was like PPC is just Google AdWords that that’s it. So it’s just anything else essentially, that could be–Lillie:Correct. And it’s actually important now to think about it in an abstract sense because people don’t really recognize channels as much as they did anymore. For example, YouTube is a search engine. I don’t think people think of YouTube as a search engine, but it is. And when people are, or clients are engaging with a business where they’re engaging in search, there are a whole bunch of different places it could be. So do think of pay-per-click as kind of an abstract concept of how a business can purchase advertising. It’s really the best way to go about it.Danny:Okay. Great. So I guess maybe the next question would be, how, I mean, I think, well, how would you use it? I mean, obviously it’s paid and…Judson:And it’s per click.Danny:And it’s per click, yes.Lillie:There you go. There you go. So you’re going to hear this a lot for all the questions you ask, but it really depends. So at a bare minimum for a business, I would say brand protection is the way to go. So anything that has anything to do with your brand. So AdWords, for example, or Facebook, just make sure you’re at least appearing for your brand. “Backyard protection” is what I like to call that. And then as you start getting into campaigns, or different goals, then you can kind of start looking through and figuring out what works out for you or what would be the best avenue for you.Judson:Okay. So on the brand protection side, where do you sort of start up from there?Lillie:Always, always, always protect your name. Absolutely. Because if you have competitors they are bidding on your name. That is the way of the world now.Danny:So, how might that, like, you mean like protecting your name, what would you do?Lillie:So if you’re buying keywords, so Google would be a place you buy keywords, Bing, Yahoo. Make sure that you’re protecting your name there. So CribMaster, for example, we buy CribMaster that specific word. And then you want to buy your own products too. So it tends to be a pretty cheap click if it’s your own stuff, but you want to make sure that base level, your names, your properties, your intellectual content is protected there. If you do nothing else at the very least protect that because as time is changing, a lot of these platforms are monetizing, right? So Google used to be fairly free from an SEO perspective. They’re trying to push more people into paid search because they make more money that way.Judson:Yeah.Lillie:Yes. So absolutely protect your name.Judson:Okay. And then the second tier sort of going after your competitors?Lillie:Ah, conquesting, I don’t actually suggest, in most situations because it’s extremely protective. So conquesting, for the audience, conquesting is essentially buying somebody else’s names or products.Judson:Okay.Lillie:Be very careful about that because if you don’t do it right, you can just, you might as well just burn your money.Judson:Okay.Danny:Okay.Lillie:You can also throw it around there are many things you can do. You’re wasting it essentially if you’re not extremely targeted and careful.Judson:Gotcha. So once we got ahold of PPC and all these different pieces that are there, you talked about autos and the different areas from a B2B perspective. B2B versus B2C how does that differ on a paperclip standard?Lillie:So I think B2B marketers especially like to think that we’re very, very different and there certainly are differences between B2C, but you’ve got to remember that everyone is glued to some kind of electronic device now and search engines, whether it’s Google, whether it’s YouTube, whether it’s going through class articles, magazines, what have you online is something that B2B decision makers make like they do that. That’s not unique to, you know, somebody looking up shoes online. That’s the way of the world now. So you do want to make sure that you’re protected for that, but you also want to make sure that you have a very nurturing relationship. Because a lot of B2B decisions take a long time, right? It’s not, again, the impulse of going to Nordstrom, “Here, my shoe’s done.” It’s making sure that you’re touching somebody at a regular point. So we may be getting into this in the next segment. But if you have somebody’s information, which is to say, maybe they went to your website, maybe you have their email address. If you’re super fancy and a physical location that people convert at, you can sometimes get information that way too. You want to make sure you’re nurturing them throughout the entire process. So I would say branding, that’s just a general thing for everybody. But as you’re going to that campaign level, if you’re going to that B2B model, maybe if you’re splitting down to a certain area, make sure you’re nurturing those people, and there are a lot of different ways you can do that that are much deeper and thorough than just brand protection.Judson:Okay. Then I guess one question that’s probably good to bring up now too, is: We’ve gotten the basics, we’ve gotten to understand the difference between B2B and B2C. And this might be really basic. What are some of the terms that people need to get familiar with to understand what the inner workings are going on, what they need to pay attention to?Lillie:There are so many letters just crammed together.Danny:Can we just start with the first 50?Lillie:Right and actually some of the letters and KPI’s is more letters.Judson:More letters for you.Lillie:Some of the KPIs vary depending on the platform. So an impression load in Facebook is a little bit different than an impression load in AdWords than it would be in DoubleClick, for example. So there’s a little bit of difference to it and just be sort of cognizant of that. Some of the most important things I would say, I am an impression share freak really. That’s what I really pay attention to. And that’s a term that’s specific to paid search within a major search engine like Bing or Google or Yahoo or any of those. So impression share essentially is how much of the market you own. There are only x amount of impressions because somebody, you know, they rely on how many searches there are. And impression share will tell you how many of those you’re hitting for. An impression is just how many times you show up, period. It’s not where you rank. It’s none of that. It’s just, if you appear in a se
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