55 minutes | Dec 17th 2020

Innovating Tech Solutions to Help Restaurants | Therese Lim and Francisco Bram from Uber Eats | DH070

Uber Eats is doing their part to help the restaurant industry and change lives with Digital Hospitality. 

They have among the most important jobs in the food industry, but the day-to-day duties of Uber Eats’ Therese Lim and Francisco Bram aren’t centered around pots and pans, taste tests, or cooking classes.

Digital Hospitality podcast guests Therese Lim and Francisco Bram from Uber Eats help bridge tech and strategy on the product and marketing side.

Therese Lim is head of restaurant product for Uber Eats. Francisco Bram is head of global product marketing for Uber Eats. They are both problem solvers.

“Every day we wake up trying to solve problems and all of them are grounded in our customer obsessed focus,” says Therese Lim during the conversation on Digital Hospitality. “Before anything we want to make sure we understand restaurateur needs and pain points. We’re not here to create sexy technology just for the sake of sexy technology.”

No, computers aren’t going to replace restaurant owners and no, robots aren’t going to replace every cook. Rather, the technology and insights provided by the work the accomplished by the team at Uber Eats will keep restaurants alive and staff employed during this painful pandemic.

 

 

What was your takeaway from this podcast episode about Uber Eats?  Email podcast@calibbq.media to get in touch with our Cali BBQ Media team and let us know.

 

 

We want to hear from you because your opinions are vital to our evolution and growth. Your voices and opinions shape this podcast and our other digital content.

Visit Cali BBQ Media online to learn about our restaurant, our media, and our lives at https://calibbq.media 

 

UBER EATS LINKS TO CLICK:

 

UberEats Stands Out:

This function over flash approach is what makes the team at Uber Eats different. Constantly listening to the needs and pain points of owners, operators and order placers, their product people are experimenting day in and day out to make the whole process better for all involved.

While the pandemic has plagued the restaurant industry painfully, the digital pivot has provided Uber Eats with access to insights and data that couldn’t be compiled on a normal pre-pandemic day of business.

“Only digital can really let you A/B test with real-time data and feedback,” notes Therese Lim during the Digital Hospitality interview. “We want to democratize that so that the same tools empower everyone.”

The proof is in the pudding as Therese is one of many team members at Uber Eats looking to improve business and life for all in the restaurant industry.

For digital doubters, computers will not replace owners and operators, in fact, tech will allow them to engage and offer more value than ever before.

“What we found is technology frees up more time for restaurant owners to be with their staff and interact with their customers instead of fiddling around in their back office,” explains Therese.

 

Check out Uber Eats online for tons of takeout and food delivery options, including our very own Cali BBQ in San Diego.

 

This same tech that’s freeing up owners to engage with their own staff and customers can also enable them to empower their peers. While 2020 has been full of heartache, pivots and pain, the next year could be a resurgence for restaurants thanks to the tools developed in this time.

“In 2021, we really want to build a peer-to-peer interaction model that allows successful restaurateurs to explain how to use our tools directly to other restaurateurs,” says Francisco Bram on Digital Hospitality.

“We don’t want to be the middleman; we want to be the tool that allows experienced restaurateurs to help other restaurateurs be successful and be inspired using our digital hospitality tools.”

 

Order Cali BBQ for delivery on Uber Eats at https://www.ubereats.com/san-diego/food-delivery/cali-comfort-bbq/

 

The Future of Uber Eats:

The future for Uber Eats in 2021 also points to an improvement of selling the same to-go cocktails that debuted in 2020 and kept many bars and restaurants in business.

“We’re working very closely with alcohol regulators in every state,” notes Therese Lim about alcohol to-go regulations. “Because we want to make sure we do this safely and compliantly. We have ID scanning technology when alcohol is delivered, and we’ve also made it so that customers who are struggling and want to stay sober can opt out of seeing alcohol items.”

As 2020 comes to a close, Uber Eats is looking ahead to more innovation but they’re continuing to build relationships with the restaurants they met during this challenging year.

“Partnering with restaurants doesn’t end when you’re on the platform, it’s really just the beginning,” emphasizes Therese.

“We work really hard to make insights available for free to say hey, we have some data about what customers are searching for and what they want. We consolidate it so it’s palatable. We don’t like talking about analytics or reporting, we want to give insights.”

Crunching numbers and finding the facts is foundational to owners and operators. Just like the restaurateurs they partner with, the Uber Eats team has been working weekends in 2020 to do everything they can to keep the lights on for the community they serve.

By helping the restaurant industry, Uber Eats has created the convergence of tech and charity in a way that’s changed lives.

“We raised $3 million for US restaurants and over $20 Million donated to restaurants around the world,” Therese tells us about their tool that allows customers to give directly to restaurants. “With the speed of technology that’s seven days, one feature and $20 million dollars all through a host of people who are passionate.”

While 40+ weeks of 2020 have been affected by the pandemic and jobs have been lost, the tech team at Uber Eats have been doing all they can to keep communities fed safely and employed just the same.

“We talked to 400 restaurants,” says Francisco Bran on the podcast. “75 percent said they would have to close their business if it wasn’t for Uber Eats and 81 percent said they would’ve had to lay off staff if it wasn’t for Uber Eats.”

“Yes, we are a tech company, but we’re really just an enabler for entrepreneurs to keep their business running during unprecedented times during pandemics. Those stats gave us a whole new appreciation for our mission.”

In 2020 and 2021, Uber Eats is not here to take your job, it’s here to save it. 

***

— Article by Cali BBQ Media Content Producer Ian Stonebrook. Get in touch with Ian at ian.stonebrook@gmail.com or on social media @ianstonebrook

 

 

5 UBER EATS FACTS TO KNOW:

  1. Uber Eats is a food delivery platform that makes getting great food from a favorite local restaurants as easy as requesting a ride.
  2. It was founded in 2014 by Uber’s Travis Kalanick and Garrett Camp.
  3. UberEats CEO is Dara Khosrowshahi.
  4. The Uber Eats Headquarters is in San Francisco, CA.
  5. Serves thousands of cities in dozens of countries.

 

 

FOLLOW @UBEREATS ON SOCIAL MEDIA:

 

 

Digital Hospitality Online —

Visit the Digital Hospitality Blog for our in-depth feature articles and behind-the-scenes looks at our business, our content, and our lives. E-mail the Cali BBQ Media team at podcast@calibbq.media.

Sign up for our email newsletter for regular updates and subscribe to the Digital Hospitality podcast on your podcast player.

***

Url First Name Last Name Email Address Phone Would you like to book a free consultation to go over your Digital Hospitality? Would you like to book a free consultation to go over your Digital Hospitality? Yes, please contact me Business Name What are your content needs?
Play
Like
Play Next
Mark Played