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Episode Info: Replay of The Wisconsin Vegetable Gardener Radio Show from 8-11-18 on 860AM WNOV and W293cx 106.5 FM Milwaukee WI, listen here during show hours Saturdays 9-10 am CST https://tinyurl.com/zvh5kaz Thank you for listening and downloading the show. Topics: Joey and Holly talk about Invasive plants in Wisconsin also what is Mycorrhizae and how it helps plants and their Guest the leading Dr. in the U.S on medical marijuana Dr Rachna Patel of https://www.drrachnapatel.com/ Invasive plants - Hog weed – looks like queen annes lace - Garlic mustard – mistaken as a native - Queen anne’s lace is also invasive - Buckthorn - Fescue - Dill - White clover - Wild parsnip - Emerald ash borer - don’t move firewood - Zebra mussels - check your boats/watercraft - mycorrhizae (my-coh-rise-eh), and they live in a symbiotic relationship with the plant itself. Mycorrhizae are actually a fungus. They exist as very tiny, almost or even entirely microscopic, threads called hyphae. The hyphae are all interconnected into a net-like web called a mycelium, which measures hundreds or thousands of miles—all packed into a tiny area around the plant. Mycorrhizae are actually a fungus. They exist as very tiny, almost or even entirely microscopic, threads called hyphae. The hyphae are all interconnected into a net-like web called a mycelium, which measures hundreds or thousands of miles—all packed into a tiny area around the plant. Mycorrhizae actually connect to plants in two ways. One form, called ectomycorrhizae, simply surrounds the outside of the roots. Another form, called endomycorrhizae, actually grows inside of the plant—their hyphae squeeze in between the cell wall and the cell membranes of the roots (sort of like wedging themselves in between a bicycle tire and the inner tube). Under normal conditions, you’re not likely to see mycorrhizae because they’re so small. But every once in a while, something amazing happens: the mycorrhizae will reproduce and send up fruiting bodies that produce spores – mushrooms plants feed their own mycorrhizae. Plants will take excess sugar produced in the leaves through photosynthesis and send it to the roots. From here, the mycorrhizae are able to absorb it to sustain themselves. The sugar from the plants literally keeps the mycorrhizae fed and alive. Mycorrhizae can help protect their plants against diseases and toxins Dr Rachna Patel is a medical marijuana Dr. She answers all types of questions about medical marijuana on youtube. Please note that medical marijuana is not legal in WI. 1.What does a medical marijuana doctor even do? 2.CBD oil is becoming more popular – what is CBD oil? 3.Many Americans have high blood pressure – can medical marijuana help control that? Would CBD oil help? 4.Does medical marijuana or CBD oil have drug interactions commonly? 5.How does smoking cannabis affect...
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