Stitcher for Podcasts

Get the App Open App
Bummer! You're not a
Stitcher Premium subscriber yet.
Learn More
Start Free Trial
$4.99/Month after free trial
HELP

Show Info

Episode Info

Episode Info: 33 and ⅓ is a monthly music column by Ryan Lynch, exploring the records that keep him inspired in a cynical world. You can find episodes on frondsradio.com and be sure to subscribe on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts. If you have any suggestions or thoughts, my twitter handle is @stoopkidliveson and I’d love to hear from you. You can find Ryan’s band, Premium Heart, on facebook, twitter, or instagram for upcoming releases and shows. The original column was published on December 15th, 2019 and can be found below. Workin’ in the fields til’ you get your back burnedWorkin’ ‘neath the wheel, til’ you get your facts learnedBaby, I got my facts, learned real good right nowPoor man want to be rich, Rich man want to be kingAnd a king ain’t satisfied til’ he rules everything Lately, I’ve found a lot of new appreciation for late 90s/early 2000s political critiques. Too often, and I’m guiltier of this than most, we become enamored by deconstructions of post-9/11 American domestic life and foreign policy and forget that there was plenty of division, strife, and protest in our “contemporary” society before the Bush Doctrine ramped it all up to 11. 9/11 was such a glaring and brutal bullet point on the American timeline that it’s easy to forget that a lot of the issues we still argue about were actually worth arguing about before we were shocked into the “modern American” mindset. A few of the things I’ve been thinking of are: Christopher Priest’s fantastic 1998-2003 run on Black Panther, which serves as a stark critique of Clinton-era foreign policy. A realization that the Star Wars prequels are secretly good and have a lot of very prescient things to say about America’s soon to start wars in the middle east. And Bruce Springsteen’s late-90s output, specifically the live record documenting the final leg of his 1999 reunion tour with the East Street Band, Live In New York City. Well my daddy come on the Ohio works, When he come home from World War TwoNow the yards just scrap and rubble. He said, “Them big boys did what Hitler couldn’t do”These mills they built the tanks and bombs, that won this country’s warsWe sent our sons to Korea and Vietnam, Now we’re wondering what they were dyin’ for When I started this column, I did a lot of soul searching on if I should include albums that weren’t just standard studio albums. Compilations don’t quite capture the moment in time and emotional thru-line that I try to focus on. Live albums have a similar problem, in that a set list might be pulling from songs that aren’t relevant to now or songs that are still popular and people want to hear. But in a live setting, older songs can be re-framed, in a new narrative, and given a new context to help us appreciate what they were trying to say all along. Bruce is someone who I’ve never really listened to and I think it’s a great disservice ...
Read more »

Discover more stories like this.

Like Stitcher On Facebook

EMBED

Show Info

Episode Options

Listen Whenever

Similar Episodes

Related Episodes