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Episode Info: Are you ever worried about boring your audience when you improvise?  Everything starts off pretty well.  But then you begin to see people fidgeting in their seats and shifting around. Alarm bells start to go off in your brain.  It feels like a full-on dance emergency! And then it happens… you start to “scribble”.   You pull out every trick in your belly dance bag of “stuff” to get their attention.  But you end up with a mish-mash of moves that make no sense. How can we use “less” to give our audience (and ourselves) a more satisfying performance? Listen now: Or Read the Transcript... Do you ever worry that you are boring your audience when you improvise?  Maybe everything starts off pretty well.  But then as you’re looking out at your audience, you begin to see people fidgeting in their seats, shifting around or maybe you think you see their eyes glazing over. You don’t panic, but you know you must do something to get their attention. That’s when it happens.  You start to “scribble”.  You throw in a few more moves and some layers.  But it doesn’t work.  They’re still shifting in their seats, looking around the room.  You’re losing them! Alarm bells start to go off in your brain.  It’s now a full-on dance emergency!  You’ve got to get your audience’s attention.  So, you pull out every trick in your belly dance bag of “stuff”. You layer, you travel, push and pull.  You basically do anything and everything you can think of.  But you end up with a mish mash of moves and none of it makes any sense. The truth is, is that you lost your audience the moment you felt required to give them more.  We’ve all heard the expression “less is more”.  How can we use less to give our audience (and ourselves) a more satisfying performance? Let’s talk about how to use repetition and alternation patterns to create interesting dance on the fly. If you worry about repeating moves too many times, stop it.  You’ll become bored with a move way before your audience does.  When you begin a move, you already know what you’re going to do.  Repeating a move gives you a chance to develop the movement phrase and it gives your audience a chance to follow your train of thought before you take a new path. Using the “Rule of 4” can be very useful for creating dance that doesn’t overwhelm you OR your audience. It helps your audience follow along throughout your performance.  It also helps your audience feel smarter. So what does the Rule of 4 look like from an audience perspective? The first time you use a move, the audience will miss it completely. The second time they see it, they’ll only begin to understand what it was. The third time they see it, they’ll begin to appreciate what you’ve done. The forth time they see the move, they’ll be able to anticipate what you’ll do and they’ll feel pretty smart when they’re right. So you can see that by the time you start to get tired o...
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