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Episode Info: Discussing women in technology is nothing new for this podcast. In the previous episodes (such as MSFT Today 2019-01-15 : Microsoft 365 Education) I've mentioned getting women, and girls in technology several times, including in guests interviews. This has always been an important issue for me, because I come from a huge family, that is nearly split down the middle of boys and girls, and I've always longed for my nieces to geek out with my like my nephews always have. Also, having been in enterprise IT for nearly two decades now, I've watched how the number of women have slowly crept up, but I've always felt that we could do better. I know women not only deserve their rightful place in technology, but they are crucial to its long-term and health growth. It is no secret, that women and men tend to approach problems differently, and thinking out side of the box doesn't exactly men's strong suit. This is the very reason I've personally hired women for my teams in the past, and I've found my best allies within my teams to be women - they are the yin to my yang, and vice-versa. The better half of my most dynamic duo of my career was a brilliant SQL engineer who was also an immigrant. Well, we were an unlikely duo teamed up by happenstance as I was designing the new clustering standard for Windows Servers, and as you know, SQL clustering and Windows Clustering go hand in hand. So she worked with me for months, as we fine tuned out build and test processes, and engaged with others - and throughout that time we became great friends, and I learned first-hand that you never judge a book by its cover. I've never been the type of person to do that anyway, but I would be lying if I said that didn't have any reservations when we were teamed up on a very important, and very expensive project. I was the outgoing, jovial, sarcastic, hates-nothing-more-in-life-than-to-be-wrong know-it-all, and here I was being teamed up for a multi-month project with someone that no one on the team really knew anything about. While she had her PHD, and was a mother of three, and was equally on par with the most brilliant database engineers I've worked with throughout my career, she was also timid, and shy - for obvious reasons. She was a fish out of water. As I said, the time I spent working with her on the six month project are some of the greatest times of my career. I learned so much from her, and continued learning from her as we remained close allies throughout our time working together. When I left the company for another opportunity, I made sure to let them know with complete certainty, that they had a special asset on their hands. The most brilliant peer I've ever had (someone at my same job level), was a woman. Plainly put, she is a technology wunderkind… and when we went through PFE school together, I was in complete awe at the full breadth of her knowledge. I've always prided myself on knowing as much as I can about as many subjects as I can, but she took that mindset...
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